What is Focus Stacking?Landscape photographers are obsessed with the idea of sharp images. They use a multitude of methods to ensure that they have a perfectly sharp image right from centimeters from the camera all the way to infinity. One technique they frequently make use of is a technique known as focus stacking. Focus stacking is a very useful tool that is available inside Photoshop. It is particularly useful for creating perfectly focused images which are tack sharp across the entire frame.In other words it is ideal for shooting images where you need a big depth of field. Read more...
An Introduction to Simple Post Processing in Adobe LightroomPost processing is a key aspect of your photography workflow. It is the final ingredient that makes an image pop from the initial shot you had taken. First rule of photography, that is if you wish to post process afterwards, is to shoot in RAW. Shooting in RAW allows you to retain all the basic image data without losing them through an on-camera development process. Read more...
Some Tips on Landscape ImageryI would say landscape photography is the most underestimated genres of photography. Budding photographersoften think there is nothing really to it and anyone with a decent enough camera can produce great landscape images. Well just as every cat has its day, a great camera will surely get it right some of the time. But for consistent results you cannot simply leave everything to the camera.To make great landscape imagery you will need meticulous preparations and a deep understanding of the basics of exposure. Read more...
How to photograph butterfliesButterflies are one of nature’s most beautiful creations. They are colorful, bright, gentle, everything that sums up Mother Nature. Harbingers of new life they are instrumental in pollination of flowers. People have long been fascinated by them, catching them and collecting them for their personal collection. Thanks to photography we now have a new way to capture them, one that wouldn’t lead to their death and yet we can enjoy their beauty for years to come. Read more...
Five features on your DSLR camera that you probably never useYour camera comes with three handy metering systems. If you are using a Canon system camera yours have four to boast. Thus far you probably have been using only one – matrix metering; which was set as default in the camera. While I have nothing against this very intelligent and useful metering mode, it is unfortunately, however, not the best for all situations. In a tricky lighting situation, where you need to manually assign something in the scene as middle-grey, matrix metering shouldn’t be the obvious choice. Read more...
Benefits of joining a photography classDigital photography is a vast field of specialized knowledge. Well, even if not many non-photographers appreciate it (one of the reasons why we have to deal with questions like, how can you possibly charge that much for taking pictures?), we photographers know that because our blood sweat and guts are spilled every day scouting for locations, making images, editing them and then putting them up for someone to say, ‘nah I could have easily done it’. Nothing makes oneangrier. But then due to the inherent nature of photography, being both a visual art form and the fact that it is highly subjective, everyone reserves the right to make a comment. Read more...
Advantages of a hand-held light meter over a built-in light meterIn one of the previous articles on this website I discussed in detail the many different metering modes and their advantages. Metering modes are what tells the camera what exposure value to use for a right exposure of a given scene. As you are already aware, there are any different types of metering modes. None of these are suitable for all situations though. Some photographers are particularly biased about certain metering modes. I in particular like the spot metering mode and normally my camera is always set to shoot on spot metering. The main reason is that being I can accurately select a spot that is middle-grey in the scene and set my exposure based on that. Read more...
How to Make Your Backgrounds Blurred

Sometimes you may need to blur out the background of your images. Let’s say you are shooting portraiture outdoors and there is a cluttered background which you don’t want to incorporate into the final image. Well you could possibly move the subject away from that spot and place her somewhere with a nicer background. But, sometimes, moving the subject may not be feasible as the lighting may change or the location being a bit cluttered overall may not allow you too much flexibility, like in the image below. So what do you do in a situation like this? There is an easier and more practical method.

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Flowers photography: tips to shoot better imagesOne of the most fascinating subjects for photography are flowers. They are bright, vibrant, comes in all shapes and sizes and thankfully they are abundant. There are flowers for every season, for every reason, for every mood and for every lens! The best thing about flower photography is that you don’t need fancy cameras and or lenses. Yes, a macro lens will take you closer and you would be able to make super sharp images of small details, but if you do it right your kits lens will provide you with excellent images as well. Read more...
Light Painting in Photography: An IntroductionLight painting is a very interesting technique in photography that predominantly uses artificial lights to illuminate a subject in low to zero ambient lighting conditions. By reading the first line you would no doubt have guessed that in order to do light painting, you need to shoot in the dark, ideally after sunset. It is true, but that does not mean that you always have to shoot in pitch black conditions. For example, even if there is some amount of twilight in the sky, you could get beautiful light painted images. It is about using your imagination, using the artificial light creatively in conjugation with whatever ambient light there is to get the best out of a situation. Read more...