Why You Should Print Your ImagesLast Monday it rained the entire morning. It was a particularly off day for me too as I spent about half an hour staring at the laptop screen and nothing seemed to come out of my head. I realized it was one of those days when Mother Nature conspires with lady luck so that I would be forced to take my eyes off the digital screen and spend some time appreciating the wonders of nature around me. Read more...
Flowers photography: tips to shoot better imagesOne of the most fascinating subjects for photography are flowers. They are bright, vibrant, comes in all shapes and sizes and thankfully they are abundant. There are flowers for every season, for every reason, for every mood and for every lens! The best thing about flower photography is that you don’t need fancy cameras and or lenses. Yes, a macro lens will take you closer and you would be able to make super sharp images of small details, but if you do it right your kits lens will provide you with excellent images as well. Read more...
Sports Photography: Tips and How-toEven if it’s not your chosen specialty, sports photography is something every photographer faces at one point or another (and another and another...). We photograph our kids’ soccer games for posterity, professional sporting events for the interest, and other fast-moving subjects because they’re right in front of us and we have a camera in our hands. Many of us even shoot children’s and amateur sporting events as an opportunity to sell our photos to proud parents. Whether it’s kids or professional athletes running down the field, knowing how to photograph fast-moving subjects is key to getting great action photos that can be shared and enjoyed. Below are ten useful tips for photographing sports that are sure to increase the quality of your action photos. Read more...
5 Useful Tips for Making Great Images in Low Light

Cameras like the Canon 5D Mark III and the Nikon D3X have completely changed the playing field when it comes to low light photography. In the earlier days photographers would have no way to change the ASA (ISO as it was called in those days) once they had loaded a film in their cameras. They were pretty much stuck with the film sensitivity until they changed it. That had a limiting effect on their creativity and it ensured that they were careful about their selection of film before heading out.

These days, digital photographers have a much easier time. They could change the ISO (light sensitivity of the sensor) just with the flick of a button. Cameras like the D800 comes with the added advantage of a greater dynamic range, allowing photographers to compose and make images that are closer to what they see with their naked eyes.

Yet, there are certain time-tested and useful tips that you need to know in order to nail good exposures in low light conditions. These are, in no way, alternatives to the ability of your camera to shoot in low light. Rather, these are complimentary to a high ISO capability.

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10 Tips on how to Shoot in Snowy Weather

1. Dress appropriately

Check the weather for the altitude you’ll be shooting at. The temperature and weather conditions will be completely different at ground level as they are up the hill. Never wear cotton. Cotton will soak up any sweat you may produce and the cold temperatures will freeze it. So you’ll end up wearing freezing cold clothing.

Invest in some great gloves. You won’t be able to wear glove all the time. You may need to get your hand out to change your camera settings or access gear in your camera bag. I had a pair of gloves that came with little glove liners, so when I pulled them out of the big warm shells I was still somewhat protected. The shells were big enough to slim my hand back in without much effort and I could still press the shutter to take a picture.

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Low Light and the Wildlife Photographer: How to Take a Photo an Editor Can Work WithWildlife photographers are faced with a unique set of challenges. Not only do they often have to travel long distances to find their subject matter, but their success is dependent upon whether or not they have the understanding of the animal and the patience to wait for just the right moment. And yet ask any photographer what is the toughest part of shooting wildlife, and you'll likely get a response that falls somewhere along the lines of dealing with low light. The majority of animals, and especially those where I shoot in Africa, are most active once the sun begins to go down, making early evening the perfect time to snap a great photograph. This is when the predators are hunting (or at least doing more than cat-napping), and the watering holes are flush with the harder-to-spot animals such as rhinos, big cats, and hyenas, to name but a few. Read more...