How to use the Panning mode in photographyPanning is the technique of going with the flow of a moving subject to make images. The movement of the camera should be at the same vector as the subject and at the same speed, while the exposures are clicked. Ideally, panning movements are used to shoot not one but a series of images and is a technique that is used in sports, wildlife and at times in everyday photography as well. Read more...
Understanding ISO, the least understood of the three exposure parametersIf you look at the main aspects that govern exposure, you would obviously realize that there are three. Three pillars unto which all exposure constructions are resting. The number three is auspicious, in religion as in photography. It is also pertinent to mention here that the number three is a recurring phenomenon in photography. Today, however, we are concerned with one of these pillars that are fundamental to all photography – ISO. Read more...
Five Natural Light Shooting TipsYou may have heard, nature and natural light photographers often say this – you must head out at least an hour before the sun peeks behind the trees. These photographers who have made a career out of shooting in natural light understand the tremendous significance of the early morning light. The early morning light (and for that matter the late afternoon light as well) is slanted, it comes at an angle that is almost parallel to the surface of the earth. What it does is it highlights textures, brings to life details like no other light can. Read more...
What is Focus Stacking?Landscape photographers are obsessed with the idea of sharp images. They use a multitude of methods to ensure that they have a perfectly sharp image right from centimeters from the camera all the way to infinity. One technique they frequently make use of is a technique known as focus stacking. Focus stacking is a very useful tool that is available inside Photoshop. It is particularly useful for creating perfectly focused images which are tack sharp across the entire frame.In other words it is ideal for shooting images where you need a big depth of field. Read more...
Understanding Lens VignettingA technical term that you are likely to hear a lot is lens vignetting. Lens vignetting (sometimes also referred to as light fall-off) is a phenomenon that causes light to not reach the entire sensor after travelling through the lens aperture. A number of reasons are attributed to the phenomenon of lens vignetting. They are mainly segregated into two – mechanical and optical. The result however is the same, dark shadows in the shape of a circle at the corner of the image. Read more...
Five features on your DSLR camera that you probably never useYour camera comes with three handy metering systems. If you are using a Canon system camera yours have four to boast. Thus far you probably have been using only one – matrix metering; which was set as default in the camera. While I have nothing against this very intelligent and useful metering mode, it is unfortunately, however, not the best for all situations. In a tricky lighting situation, where you need to manually assign something in the scene as middle-grey, matrix metering shouldn’t be the obvious choice. Read more...
Benefits of joining a photography classDigital photography is a vast field of specialized knowledge. Well, even if not many non-photographers appreciate it (one of the reasons why we have to deal with questions like, how can you possibly charge that much for taking pictures?), we photographers know that because our blood sweat and guts are spilled every day scouting for locations, making images, editing them and then putting them up for someone to say, ‘nah I could have easily done it’. Nothing makes oneangrier. But then due to the inherent nature of photography, being both a visual art form and the fact that it is highly subjective, everyone reserves the right to make a comment. Read more...
Low angle photography tipsOne of the least used perspectives in photography is the low angle. I bet every photographer thinks why get my camera dirty when my tripod can stoop down to inches from the ground? Well, can your tripod set the camera actually on the ground? I don’t think so. Because that is one of the camera positions that I am referring to when I say low-angle. About a foot and a half from the ground is no good when you want to capture something that is crawling on the ground or you want to capture something so unique which nobody else thinks of. You have to set your camera on the ground. Read more...
The Use of Diagonal Lines in Photography CompositionWe often read about the creative uses of lines in photography. The horizon line is one such oft used line in compositions that separates the point where the earth and the sky meets. As a beginner photographer you may have been told never to place the horizon line bang in the middle of a composition. The reason is this results in a composition that is anything but interesting. Raising the horizon line and placing it roundabout 2/3rds the way down or 2/3rds the way up results in a much better composition. E.g., the image below. Read more...
How to Make Your Backgrounds Blurred

Sometimes you may need to blur out the background of your images. Let’s say you are shooting portraiture outdoors and there is a cluttered background which you don’t want to incorporate into the final image. Well you could possibly move the subject away from that spot and place her somewhere with a nicer background. But, sometimes, moving the subject may not be feasible as the lighting may change or the location being a bit cluttered overall may not allow you too much flexibility, like in the image below. So what do you do in a situation like this? There is an easier and more practical method.

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